Cathay Pacific crew witnessed North Korea missile test

Cathay Pacific crew witnessed North Korea missile test

Cathay Pacific crew witnessed North Korea missile test

In the early hours of Wednesday, North Korea test-fired what is believed to be its most technologically advanced long-range ballistic missile.

The North Korean missile was sacked very high up, reaching an altitude of 4,475 kilometers (2,780 miles) before falling back into the Sea of Japan about 950 kilometers (600 miles) from where it was launched.

Singapore Airlines (SINGF) said its flights don't travel "in the vicinity of the missile trajectory" because of the route change it made to avoid the northern part of the sea between the Korean peninsula and Japan. Cathay Pacific's crew reported seeing the weapon re-enter the Earth's atmosphere, while Korean Air said its pilots "saw a flash".

"At the moment, no one is changing any routes or operating parameters", the Hong Kong-based airline said in a statement.

The missile soared 2,800 miles into space without any apparent issue, but it is unclear how the weapon performed during atmospheric re-entry, as views within the intelligence community appear to vary.

Читайте также: UT closing in on deal to make Rainsville's Jeremy Pruitt new HC

While North Korea has claimed that their new weapon has put all parts of the United States within reach of a devastating strike, US officials say the latest test was a failure since the missile broke apart on re-entry as the airliner witnessed.

European airlines Lufthansa and Air France-KLM shifted their paths in August after two North Korean test launches in July.

The missile was far from the plane, and operation was unaffected, Cathay said, adding that it had informed other carriers and relevant authorities. "We remain alert and review the situation as it evolves". However, South Korea says that the North Korean government regularly fails to issue these notices when conducting missile launches. North Korea joined the ICAO in 1977, but the last time it warned the organization of an impending missile launch was in February 2016.

The chances of a plane being struck randomly by a missile are "billions to one", according to CNN aviation safety analyst David Soucie.

При любом использовании материалов сайта и дочерних проектов, гиперссылка на обязательна.
«» 2007 - 2017 Copyright.
Автоматизированное извлечение информации сайта запрещено.

Код для вставки в блог

Related news