As Hurricane Florence nears, live surf cam videos show impact on Carolinas

As Hurricane Florence nears, live surf cam videos show impact on Carolinas

As Hurricane Florence nears, live surf cam videos show impact on Carolinas

The outer bands of Hurricane Florence began battering the coast of North and South Carolina Thursday with strong winds and rain.

The News & Observer reports that the storm's path shifted early Wednesday and it is now bearing down on southern North Carolina and northern SC, where it could dump up to 40 inches of rain in places.

Forecasters said conditions would only get more lethal when the storm smashed ashore early on Friday near the North Carolina-South Carolina line and crawled slowly inland. These could be as high as 13ft (4m) along parts of the North Carolina coast.

Weather Underground meteorology director Jeff Masters said Florence eventually could strike as merely a Category 1 hurricane with winds less than 100 miles per hour (160 kph), but that's still enough to cause at least $1 billion in damage.

She said a hurricane has a way of bringing everyone to the same level.

The mayor of Carolina Beach, North Carolina, said authorities have stopped allowing traffic to the island via the only bridge between the island and the mainland.

It is the storm's movement and not its strength that has forecasters and officials anxious.

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Even if you didn't know that the powerful storm is forecast to gain strength as it hits the coast on Friday, or that it will dump several months of rain onto the region in a mere few days, or that the storm surge could reach as high as 9 to 13 ft.

Storm surges are caused when huge volumes of water are pushed by hurricane-force winds.

"Either no (hotel) rooms are available, or we are denied because the breed or size of dogs", she said. "That's the second story of a house", North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper said Thursday morning.

Wilmington resident Julie Terrell said she was concerned after walking to breakfast past a row of shops fortified with boards, sandbags and hurricane shutters. "If we lose the house, oh well, we can get housing".

Up to 40 inches of rain could fall in North Carolina.

"Since my husband retired and my health declined, we have his retirement as an income".

Brock Long, the administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), warned the danger was not only along the coast: "Inland flooding kills a lot of people, unfortunately, and that's what we're about to see", he said.

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Tens of thousands are without power in North Carolina.

GETTY IMAGES |AFPAbout 1.7 million people in North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia are under voluntary or mandatory evacuation orders and millions of others live in areas likely to be affected by what officials called a "once in a lifetime" storm.

After criticism for its response in Puerto Rico to last year's Hurricane Maria, which officials there said was responsible for 3,000 deaths, Trump has vowed a vigorous response to Florence and defended his handling of Maria.

More than 1 million people have been ordered to evacuate - but the window to do so in nearly over.

Another live stream at Wilmington Tower, which usually broadcasts sweeping views of the North Carolina landscape, shows storm clouds rolling in over the ocean.

"I have no generator", said Petra Langston, a nurse.

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