Ever Baby Born Following A Uterus Transplant From A Deceased Donor

Ever Baby Born Following A Uterus Transplant From A Deceased Donor

Ever Baby Born Following A Uterus Transplant From A Deceased Donor

TThe first successful birth of a child from a womb transplanted from a dead donor in Brazil should give hope to thousands of British women that they can have children, doctors said.

The recipient had Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, which affects about one in every 4,500 women and results in the vagina and uterus (womb) failing to form properly.

The donor was a 45-year-old woman who died of subarachnoid haemorrhage - a type of stroke involving bleeding on the surface of the brain.

The mother and baby, born through c-section on December 15, 2017, are now cemented in medical history as the first to successfully use a uterus from a deceased donor.

In a landmark move, a baby in Brazil has been born to a woman with a transplanted uterus from a deceased donor.

Ten prior attempts using deceased donors in the United States, the Czech Republic, and Turkey haven't worked, the report noted.

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To prevent her body from rejecting the new organ, the woman was given five different drugs, along with antimicrobials, anti-blood clotting treatments, and aspirin.

In a commentary published with the Lancet case study, two researchers suggest that as more successful uterus transplant surgeries are performed, it may be possible to expand the eligibility criteria.

Uterus transplants have become more common in recent years, resulting in 11 live births around the world.

The whole field of uterus transplantation is in its early days.

In a surgery lasting 10.5 hours, the uterus was removed from the donor and transplanted into the recipient, where it was connected to the recipient's veins and arteries as well as her ligaments and vaginal canals.

The woman, a 32-year-old psychologist, was initially apprehensive about the transplant, said Dr Dani Ejzenberg, the transplant team's lead doctor at the University of Sao Paulo School of Medicine.

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The donated uterus was removed during the delivery, as is typical for such transplants - this way the patient doesn't have to keep taking the medications needed to avoid rejection. Lavery said that, at least theoretically, the procedure could be used to allow trans women to carry a baby. Seven months after the transplant, the woman's fertilized eggs were implanted into the uterus, resulting in pregnancy.

"The numbers of people willing and committed to donate organs upon their own deaths are far larger than those of live donors, offering a much wider potential donor population", he said.

"However, the need for a live donor is a major limitation as donors are rare, typically being willing and eligible family members or close friends".

In this trial, the mother was given standard doses of immune suppression medications for nearly six months, with positive results, before implantation of the embryo was completed.

"We must congratulate the authors", commented Dr Srdjan Saso, an honorary clinical lecturer in obstetrics and gynaecology at Imperial College London, describing the findings as "extremely exciting".

Although uterus transplants are a growing area of medicine, they remain highly experimental and are very hard surgeries to complete.

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Stuart Lavery, a consultant gynaecologist at Hammersmith hospital who was not involved in the latest study, said the birth was "quite a significant step", noting that using wombs from deceased donors improves safety.

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